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Tag: server

KILLING A WINDOWS SERVICE THAT SEEMS TO HANG ON “STOPPING”

It sometimes happens (and it’s not a good sign most of the time): you’d like to stop a Windows Service, and when you issue the stop command through the SCM (Service Control Manager) or by using the ServiceProcess classes in the .NET Framework or by other means (net stop, Win32 API), the service remains in the state of “stopping” and never reaches the stopped phase. It’s pretty simple to simulate this behavior by creating a Windows Service in C# (or any .NET language whatsoever) and adding an infinite loop in the Stop method. The only way to stop the service is by killing the process then. However, sometimes it’s not clear what the process name or ID is (e.g. when you’re running a service hosting application that can cope with multiple instances such as SQL Server Notification Services). The way to do it is as follows:

Synchronise time with external NTP server on Windows Server

Time synchronization is an important aspect for all computers on the network. By default, the clients computers get their time from a Domain Controller and the Domain Controller gets his time from the domain’s PDC Operation Master. Therefore the PDC must synchronize his time from an external source. I usually use the servers listed at the NTP Pool Project website. Before you begin, don’t forget to open the default UDP 123 port (in- and outbound) on your firewall.